The sound of one hand clapping (the artist acknowledges the classic Zen kōan)
19 February to 10 March 2018

  1. The more things change, the more things stay the same
    oil on board
    665 x 1260 mm
    2018
    $7,400
  2. The lawyer and the hapless spy
    oil on board
    1270 x 645 mm
    2018
    $7,400
  3. The relentless pursuit of justice
    oil on board
    1275 x 665 mm
    2018
    $7,400
  4. The renter and her children
    oil on board
    1365 x 765 mm
    2018
    $7,400
  5. Outside looking in
    oil on board
    1365 x 765 mm
    2016
    $8,500
  6. The outgoing tide 1
    oil on board
    670 x 670 mm
    2018
    $2,500
  7. Rachel and her sisters
    oil on board
    925 x 670 mm
    2018
    $7,400
  8. The outgoing tide 2
    oil on board
    670 x 670 mm
    2018
    $2,500

The sound of one hand clapping
The layers of explanation that can be articulated by this phrase are many
It is the way the unsettling phrase resonates with me when I try to understand its meaning is the closest I get to explaining the meditative state I return to when I make art.
The act of making new things - things that have never existed before now unsettles me. My thoughts crave for answers and balance and truth - and my head aches with the needless scurrying and bouncing of ideas this phrase conjures up and nothing appears to rise out of the noise of the uncaused sound

Three works have their inspiration in family tribal events that at once are current yet are 165 years old and they are different yet they are the same
Then there is the place itself – a little 158 year old church in Mangere, St James Anglican church http://www.st-james-nz.org/page_5.

The actors are the crown and the tribal taumata (old people) of Ngati Wai, the battle ground is the Treaty of Waitangi