Erasing code worlds
1 April to 5 May 2019

From the Erasing code worlds series:

  1. Red Monochrome
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800
  2. Blue Monochrome
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800
  3. Three Colours
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800
  4. Blue Monochrome
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800
  5. Red Monochrome
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800
  6. Three Colours
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800
  7. Green Monochrome
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800
  8. Three Colours
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800
  9. Red Monochrome
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800
  10. Blue Monochrome
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800
  11. Green Monochrome
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800
  12. Three Colours
    watercolour and pencil on paper
    700 X 720 mm
    2014
    $4,800

 

The paintings in Erasing code worlds were first exhibited at Te Uru Waitakere Contemporary Gallery, Auckland (2015), in Homeworld: Kathy Barry and Isobel Thom. The series acknowledges a world of light and frequency that is glimpsed at the edges of the perceptual bandwidth. Within this sea of energy flow currents of electromagnetic frequencies from the earth and cosmos that travel in pathways through and around the human body, converging in pockets of intensity. Generating the currents that activate the subtle energy bodies that encase the human body, such as the star-shaped Merkaba and the rotational Toroidal Fields. Quantum structures to expand consciousness – both world-making and -breaking.

In the accompanying publication for the show at Te Uru, Jan Bryant wrote:

"Homeworld, its affective register, recalls very lightly the aesthetic of early European modernism, without crudely mimicking it. And thus, I invoke it here, not in the spirit of nostalgia (where the past is reduced to the retro and wholly commodified), but closer to Benjamin's monad. It is the spark that comes from the past, replete with the kind of utopian expectations that first fashioned early modernism, ready to be remade under new conditions."