SAM DUCKOR-JONES       boy oh boy oh boy oh boy       WORKS

Anō Nei He Wai ~ Like Water
6 to 18 May 2019

Heidi Brickell

  1. Prolifery Fold – Pōkai Whenua, Leibniz & Frida Kahlo
    2019
    cotton duck, thread, acrylic and medium
    950 x 1090 mm
    $1,600
  2. Dendritic Shower – Rangiwhakaoma, painter Duchamp and Oliver Sacks
    2019
    cotton duck, acrylic and medium
    1590 x 1180 mm
    $2,600
  3. Probe
    2018
    cotton duck, thread, acrylic and medium
    950 x 1090 mm
    $1,400

Suji Cho

  1. Teatime (red)
    2019
    mercerised cotton
    835 x 1400 mm
    $200
  2. Teatime (yellow)
    2019
    mercerised cotton
    835 x 1400 mm
    $250
  3. Swimming
    2019
    mercerised cotton
    1840 x 1090 mm
    $450

Julia Johnston

  1. Schulz Creek
    2017
    fujiflex archival print
    610 x 1760 mm
    $350

Ana Krakosky

  1. River twists
    2018
    marsden jade and sterling silver
    100 x 150 mm
    $700
  2. Ever decreasing circles in water
    2019
    marsden jade
    60 x 60 mm
    $190
  3. Essence of water
    2019
    nz big bay jade
    65 x 10 mm
    $550
  4. Water ripples
    2018
    marsden jade and sterling silver
    70 x 70 mm
    $380
  5. Seeds in a pool
    2019
    marsden jade
    45 x 60 mm (reversible)
    $170
  6. Rata Flower
    2019
    marsden jade
    50 x 65 mm
    $140
  7. Spiral Falls
    2019
    marsden jade
    45 x 45 mm
    $140

Claudia Kogachi

  1. Portrait of my Jiichen #1
    2018
    acrylic on canvas
    285 x 235 mm
    $850
  2. Portrait of my Jiichen #2
    2018
    acrylic on canvas
    285 x 235 mm
    $850

Rachel Manning

  1. + 4 + 4 te moana-nui-a-kiwa
    2019
    pencil on paper
    500 x 695 mm
    $280

Noel Mckenna

  1. Horse Fence
    2017
    watercolour on paper
    300 x 390 mm
    $2,000
  2. Life Drawing
    2017
    watercolour on paper
    300 x 390 mm
    $2,000
  3. Dog stepping out of Stream
    2019
    watercolour on paper
    300 x 390 mm
    $2,000
  4. Fish talking to Horse
    2017
    watercolour on paper
    300 x 390 mm
    $2,000
  5. Life Drawing
    2017
    watercolour on paper
    300 x 390 mm
    $2,000

Oliver Roake

  1. Untitled
    2019
    sterling silver
    25 x 35 x 40 mm
    $300

Tom Tuke

  1. The Fourly
    2018
    acrylic on pine
    90 x 523 x 45 mm
    $500
  2. The Last Panel
    2018
    pencil on paper
    595 x 420 mm
    $270

Notes from the curator, Tom Tuke:
I first conceived the idea for a show to do with streams when I was living north of Greymouth on the West Coast. Julia Johnston grew up on the Coast Road and her photography is a testament to this intimacy. While her neighbour might have had a radio receiver set up to intercept alien communication, it's her photo of schulz creek that is truly galactic. The illusion in the tannins made me think about the qualities of water, and creeks.

I figure that most of us probably have a connection to one or two streams, and probably for vastly different reasons. They are sources of water and food, they are boundaries, they are habitats, they are paths for exploration. They are metaphors - streaming video, the source of an idea, to be swum against. I decided to work with artists who would enjoy grappling with this challenge of considering the stream, as a starting point for their work.

I met Ana Krakosky (Te Atiawa) when I moved to the West Coast. She is the hard materials teacher in Hokitika, and has a stunning ability to teach herself skills and technologies and then pass the fresh knowledge on to students. Ana has a background of art and design and working with a wide range of materials, including jade, silver and wood.

"I'm on a personal journey to celebrate the natural beauty of pounamu, with its delicacy and strength. I enjoy its willingness to be transformed into objects of desire. Inspiration for my work comes from nature, movement and the simplicity of good design. I have a love of learning how to manipulate the material, to challenge my own abilities and stretch my own limitations."

Oliver Roake is another skilful maker, often working on dense wood carvings, where he uses sound waves to dictate grooves. This work is a fascinating insight into how his mind works - and the scales he deals with. His silversmithing provides both a delicate binary to the rest of the practice, and also has the whiff of a scale model. He works part-time for a scale modelling company, recreating architects' ideas in miniature. Perhaps this pond will one day protrude from a wall, on a massive civic scale?

" The object I gave you is a way of bringing streams of consciousness into the physical. The metaphysical to physical. They are abstractions of ideas in miniature. Having worked with ADF over the last few years I have come to appreciate this scale as a way of bringing ideas to the physical that are maybe not ready or able to be made physical in the way originally thought."

Oliver studied at Elam, and has recently showed with FHE Gallery at the Auckland Art Fair.

Heidi Brickell's art practice explores relationships between the authentic and the cultivated, the socially inherited and the personal, with regards to a Māori voice. She descends from Matahourua, Takitimu and Tainui waka and works as an educator across the fields of visual art, literature and Māori medium. Recent solo exhibitions are Plastic Normal, at Fresh Gallery, Ōtara, 2018 and Porous Fortress, at State Gallery, Mt Eden, 2019.'

Julia Johnston grew up on the West Coast, and studied at Ilam School of Fine Arts. Her current work predominantly consists of photographing and documenting the Coast Road, between Rapahoe and Charleston.

Claudia Kogachi responded to the brief by thinking of her grandparents, and their surroundings in Oahu, Hawaii.

"Wahiawa is situated in the Central Valley of Oahu, in between the two volcanic mountains (Wai'anae Mountains and Ko'olau Mountains) that make up the island of Oahu, Hawaii. Lake Wilson which all of the houses on my grandparents st backs onto, used to be the playground for kids of my grandparents generation living in Wahiawa.
The conditions of Lake Wilson have deteriorated since my grandfather was a child. The lake is now a moss green with little movement. At 89, my grandfather still lives in the same house that overlooks the lake. With now minimum use, the lake sits practically untouched. My grandfather who once used to swim and lie under the sun by the lake, now swims at his local gym and rests on his couch at home."

Claudia studied at Elam, and the University of Hawaii on exchange. She has had recent solo shows at Sanderson Gallery, Window Gallery, Meanwhile, and currently has a show up in Allpress Gallery in Auckland.

Suji Cho is based in Tāmaki Makaurau and is currently studying a Master of Design in Textiles at AUT. She uses computerised knitting machines to fabricate memories into personal narrative textiles. I love the way Suji uses material and shape to an almost comic effect. The parallel lines of the lane-ropes almost flex and move like the knit. The large tea towel looks set to soak up an industrial-strength spill of tea.

Rachel Manning lives in Tāmaki Makaurau and graduated from Elam School of Fine Arts in 2012. Their work is inspired by Witi Ihimaera's mermaids in the novel The Matriarch.

Noel McKenna is based in Sydney, and has shown work extensively through Australia, New Zealand and the world. His paintings resonate with so many of the works in the show. The fish and the horse feel like the premise of a joke or allegory, yet they are trapped I the pictorial realm. What are they thinking? I enjoy wondering about what all the different characters and animals would do if the could somehow travel between pictures. I imagine Suji and Rachel's swimmers paddling into this scene.

Tom Tuke is an artist and teacher based in Tāmaki Makaurau. His practice consists of wood carving, drawing, cartooning, and constructing puppets. The Last Panel weaves together the dread of the final panel of the year 13 folio board, and the gothic heaviness of the West Coast. The hand over the face seems to be a motif in NCEA art, because it shows the dread, and because it's quicker and easier to not draw a face.